One Man, One Cow, One Planet

“Rather that battle the problem he lives the solution, Peter keeps his hands in the soil!” – Quote from the movie One Man, One Cow, One Planet (Cloud South Films, NZ) About the documentary film: One Man, One Cow, One Planet (Amazon) follows Peter Proctor, New Zealand’s father of biodynamics along the back roads of rural India, revealing the miracle of organics and the farmers who are reclaiming their agricultural heritage. I heard of this film from Rob Bowers, co-owner of Whitted Bowers Farm, which by the way, is North Carolina’s first to be certified as a biodynamic farm. You can view the film in six segments from a share on YouTube, the first segment will get you access to all the remaining segments. More quotes that inspire me to continue a study in biodynamics: “Biodynamic raised plants costs the same or less to produce when compared to traditional and conventional chemical farming methods, because biodynamic produce can get anywhere from 10% to 100% more at market.”   “One of the benefits of biodynamic farming is that you can make all your fertilizer; you don’t have to buy anything. One of the benefits in India is all of the biomass that the farmer can grow from cow manure and convert it to healthy viable compost.”   “There is no real comparison between conventional farming and biodynamic farming, because the biodynamic farmer nourishes his soil, he is the steward of the soil because he knows it’s going to be needed for the next hundred, two hundred, three hundred years. A conventional farmer all his fertile soil is gone within ten years.”    “With...

Make Your Own Potting Soil

We are getting ready to start our spring crop seeds soon based on our hardiness zone in Wake Forest, NC. We are in the hardiness zone 7, which means that our typical last frost date is around April 11 – 20 each year, or April 16 on average. And according to my set out dates, germination and growing dates, we have calculated the seed start dates for all our produce, which means that parsley seeds should have been started on January 10, and onions seeds are due to be started on January 28. I found a great seed starting soil mix recipe on the Organic Gardening website under the title Blend Your Own Seed-Starting Mix, I made several 10-gallon batches of this last year, and just made a 12-gallon batch yesterday.  I will show you how I made my 12-gallon batch. The recipe is quite easy to follow, you just make sure that your volume measurements are equivalent for each product. 4 parts screened compost 2 parts sphagnum peat moss and/or coir 1 part vermiculite 1 part perlite Just measure and mix the ingredients into a large container or a wheelbarrow like I do. Here are the steps I used to screen my compost. Harvest the mature compost from the bin                 Screen the compost into the wheelbarrow using hardware wire cloth.                 Shake the compost through the screen to keep large undecomposed organic material out.                 Add your peat moss, perlite, and vermiculite to the container or wheelbarrow.    ...